How to apply frangrances and perfumes

How to Apply Your Fragrance

JANUARY 23, 2017
BY: MARIANNE MYCHASKIW InStyle

Although it's completely invisible once it makes contact with your skin, fragrance has the weird ability to say so much about your personality and tastes while you remain completely silent, and has the potential to leave a lasting impression on anyone who catches a passing whiff. Traditionally, applying the scent on your pulse points was the go-to method, as the heat from your wrists, behind your hears, and on your neck would make the notes more prominent, but according to perfumer Louise Turner, who is the nose behind Carolina Herrera's new Good Girl fragrance, pretty much anything goes. "Wherever you want to be perfumed is the correct place to apply fragrance—even the spray and walk through method is good," she tells us. "The only thing I'd recommend against is rubbing your wrists together after you spray it on. I don't know why some people always want to do that, but it doesn't last as long when applied that way." The rubbing motion breaks apart the fragrance molecules, so Turner recommends first allowing the perfume to settle into your skin, and if you must, opt for tapping motions rather than rubbing. If you don't like the way the scent develops with your skin chemistry, try misting your hair or your clothing instead so that the notes stay true to what you smell in the bottle.

Your perfume should leave somewhat of a trail, but there's a fine line between a subtle hint and an overpowering aroma that could easily trigger a headache for those around you—especially if you've been wearing one scent for a while. "Something I hear people say is that they get to a stage where you can't smell it on yourself anymore, but to a certain degree, that's normal because you get used to it," she continues. "But then, you tend to over-perfume because you'll spray it on again." According to Turner, fragrances generally have a lifespan of 4 to 6 hours, with some slightly longer depending on the notes used. It should still be pretty prominent to everyone else if you perfume in the morning, leaving no need for a touch-up, though if the urge gets the better of you, do so after 4 to 6 hours. Better yet, ask your friend to the left if your signature scent is too strong before making any sudden movements to reapply.

Deborah LaBron
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No Matter The Letters...

Deborah LaBron
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Theta Phi Alpha Foundation Thank You Sorority Perfume

Theta Phi Alpha Foundation

Did you know that Theta Phi Alpha has their own, uniquely crafted fragrance? This exclusive, uniquely crafted scent was created especially for Theta Phi Alpha and donated by Sorority Perfume to the Penguin Parade of Prizes. Thank you for this great donation.

Deborah LaBron
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EIU Alpha Phi Thanks for Following "Sorority Perfume"!

EIU Alpha Phi Thanks for Following "Sorority Perfume"!

EIU Alpha Phi followed us @SororityPerfume on Twitter. EIUAlphaPhi sent a favorite photo and they are receiving a bottle of "Sorority Perfume"; Alpha Phi Official licensed label for their next fundraiser! Thank You EIUAlphaPhi! #SororityPerfume

Deborah LaBron
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Sorority Perfume Photo Contest!

Sorority Perfume Photo Contest!

Send your sorority's photo for the quarterly Sorority Perfume Photo Contest. The sorority’s photo selected will receive a bottle of their sorority’s perfume to go to their cause. We will choose a new winning photo for the Sorority Perfume slideshow once quarterly.

A shout out to Alpha Chi Omega, Elon University for their AXO Real Strong Weekend silent auction, which made $2500.00 for the domestic violence shelter. Your Alpha Chi Omega Sorority Perfume bottle made over $50 towards the event!
Deborah LaBron
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Perfume Design for Sorority Perfume

The perfume design of Sorority Perfume is based on the scents worn by the early Greek. The historical warm, seductive, erotic blend of Sorority Perfume is hand blended with perfume oils of sweet cane, sage, violet, vanilla, sandalwood, patchouli, amber and a hint of cinnamon.

Sorority Perfume was designed from plant oils used by the ancient Greek. The perfume oils were from local flowers, herbs and spices. Perfume was central to ancient Greek life. It was at the centre of hospitality, wealth, status. Perfume was seen as erotic, mystical, spiritual and linked to beauty.

Enjoy!

Deborah LaBron

Designer of Sorority Perfume

Deborah LaBron
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